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Creating an Effective Mentoring Program, Part 2: Program Design Considerations

Faculty Development Faculty Recruitment and Retention

Creating an Effective Mentoring Program, Part 2: Program Design Considerations

effective mentoring programs
There are many ways to successfully organize an effective faculty mentoring program. Since one size doesn’t fit all, campus leaders must determine the best use of available resources to meet the needs of new faculty members based on local circumstances, opportunities, and constraints.

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This is the second in a series of articles about creating and maintaining an effective mentoring program. There are many ways to successfully organize an effective faculty mentoring program. Since one size doesn’t fit all, campus leaders must determine the best use of available resources to meet the needs of new faculty members based on local circumstances, opportunities, and constraints. When developing an effective mentoring program, there are several critical decisions you must make: Several additional decisions will also need to be made before you formally begin your mentoring program, such as: The more accurately you can envision your program in advance, the greater will be your for success. Look for the sweet spot between organization and flexibility. Kenneth L. Alford, PhD, is a professor at Brigham Young University. Tyler J. Griffin, PhD, is an associate teaching professor at Brigham Young University. Reach them at Ken_Alford@byu.edu and Tyler_Griffin@byu.edu.